Concrete Playground

Sarah Ward | 23 April 2016

tim-picnicBoasting Conigrave’s warm, impassioned tones as its centrepiece, Remembering the Man revisits familiar details … yet nothing about the retelling feels repetitive or tired. Even the most well-worn tidbits come to life through Conigrave’s frank remembrances, accompanied by a moving collage of photographs and archival footage, and fleshed out by to-camera interviews with many of the duo’s friends.

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Greg King’s Film Reviews

Greg King | 22 April 2016

topolinoRemembering The Man offers an even more revealing record of Conigrave’s life than his own novel, and anyone who has seen Holding The Man in any of its incarnations will find this documentary a wonderfully frank and moving companion piece.

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Scoop

Scott Wallace | 18 April 2016

tim-and-john“Through the lens of Tim and John’s relationship, Remembering the Man finds a broader focus on the extreme stigma and fear that characterised the most destructive period of the AIDS epidemic. The film very eloquently creates a disarming balance between the political and the personal – through the inevitable tears, there is a vital story that it is profoundly important to preserve.”

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Film Blerg

James Madden | 20 April 2016

rememberingthemanRemembering the Man serves as the final and missing element to the Conigrave-Caleo story. Remarkably moving, touching and poignant, it may not add too much more to the story that has already been told, but it certainly adds a much-needed layer, admirably enhancing what the audience already knows from another affecting perspective.”

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cinephilia

Sharon Hurst | 20 April 2016

Tim Conigrave - Wake“The film is not only an homage to an enduring love, but also an important record of an era. Tim himself was quite an activist and we get terrific footage of early drama pieces he wrote about AIDS/HIV … While retaining moments of humour Remembering the Man is not only very moving but carries an important reminder that we must remain vigilant in ensuring that as a society we remain open and understanding to all.”

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The Age

Craig Mathieson | 17 April 2016

screen-shot“Nickolas Bird and Eleanor Sharpe’s touching film is built around Conigrave’s own testimony for an AIDS oral history project, and his words are warmly open. The recollections of friends, but not family, add to the welter of archival material, and the story calmly takes in the changing social milieu the pair lived through, from teenage freedom in the 1970s to the sudden onslaught of discriminatory panic that came with the devastating spread of AIDS through the gay community.”

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The Low Down Under

Stephen | 5 April 2016

tim-conigraveRemembering The Man, a new documentary by Nickolas Bird and Eleanor Sharpe, is a treasure trove of intimate archival footage in much the same way as Asif Kapadia’s Oscar wining effort Amy … A painstakingly put together and beautifully rendered personal history of Timothy Conigrave and John Caleo. Quite magnificent.”

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SameSame

The_Freak | 27 February 2016

9681d_562833“Five years in the making and with the blessing of both the Conigrave and Caleo families, this insightful and revealing documentary shares with its audience a wealth of home movies, student movies from Xavier College, still photographs from family and friends and television footage. There is additional footage throughout Remembering The Man of the changing times that both men lived through also.”

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scenestr

Tim Byrnes | 18 February 2016

john-and-tim-byron“Directors Nickolas Bird and Eleanor Sharpe don’t just allow Conigrave to tell his story; they also fill the gaps in the book through interviews with friends of the couple. The friends who appear throughout the film offer insights on the couple from a different angle; things even Conigrave and Caleo wouldn’t have known … Through these interviews, those who have read the book are offered an epilogue of sorts with Conigrave’s own illness and death given a chance to be told.”

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Planet Arts Group

Kerith Manderson-Galvin | 17 February 2016

john-and-tim-autumn“It is radical and meaningful when Congrave talks about Caleo’s erection, kissing on a park bench, sex, sick bodies. The film uses real footage and photographs that takes us through from the mid 70s to 1994 and is supported by present day interviews of friends and Congrave’s voice … It is an honest and tasteful retelling of their story, and one that should be watched and remembered and retold. Remembering the Man celebrates beyond the story of Congrave and Caleo as love story and as activism.”

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FilmInk

Colin Fraser | 2016

john-and-tim-youth“This beautifully crafted documentary is a companion piece to Neil Armfield’s Holding The Man, as it revisits the lives of Tim Conigrave and his lover, John Caleo. Where Armfield and playwright, Tommy Murphy, dramatised Conigrave’s seminal book, filmmakers, Nickolas Bird and Eleanor Sharpe, get Tim to tell his own story.”

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SameSame

Glen Dunks | 28 October 2015

john-and-tim-byron-bay“Along with newly recorded interviews with Tim’s friends, this film hails itself as the true record of Tim and John’s life – more so than even his own book given that Tim had his version of events that was full of rehearsed exaggeration, concessions to the truth and deliberate omissions, as well as Tim’s habit of merging multiple real people into single characters for the sake of brevity.”

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ArtsHub

Richard Watts | 20 October 2015

rememberingtheman“Editing is sharp, judiciously overlaying images and reminiscences, and when appropriate, cutting from speaker to speaker to create a rich, substantive retelling of the past … Remembering the Man is both powerful and engaging; a fitting tribute to Tim Conigrave, the author of an ur-text of the AIDS pandemic, and his husband, John Caleo”.

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Adelaide University Union

Riley Calaby | October 2015

atom2015_4723_Remembering-the-Man_original_19Io2g_960x540pxRemembering The Man is a moving, harrowing documentary about the relationship between Tim Conigrave and John Caleo. Go and see [it]. Make sure you don’t miss an important chapter of our queer history, a sensitive, intimate tragedy, and a defining Australian romance.”

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